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I’m involved in someone else’s divorce

If you are involved with a family members divorce, or your company has been drawn into an owners family litigation, it is vital that you get top representation as soon as you can.

The English family courts have a wide discretion to make orders against property, even when that property is held in the name of another person. Equally, the courts will often look at extracting cash from businesses owned by one of the parties.

If you have been joined to a divorce, it is possible that the court will look to make orders against property in your name. 

Furthermore, if you are the new partner of a party involved in divorce proceedings, any large gifts or money transfers may be scrutinised by the court to ensure they do not constitute attempts to hide assets.

Although extremely rare, it is also possible that if you are involved with one of the parties in divorce proceedings, the petitioner may attempt to name you as a co-respondent if they are filing for a divorce based on adultery. This, however, is extremely unlikely to happen and the Family Procedure Rules 2010 state that a third party should only be named if it is thought the divorce petition may be contested. Again, contesting divorce petitions is extremely rare. 

As top family lawyers, we have over a decade of experience of big money divorce cases. We combine high quality legal advice with an unrivalled in-house financial forensic team. We will help you to engage with the divorce proceedings and defend your assets.

We offer a free consultation to qualifying individuals. Please call our confidential enquiry line on 020 7404 9390 or email us. Lines are staffed 24 hours.

Frequently Asked Questions

Under section 37 of the Matrimonial Causes Act, a transfer of property can be set aside if the court is satisfied that it was done to frustrate a matrimonial claim. If you have received property from a parent, it is possible that, on divorce, the other parent or step-parent might try to set it aside.

Sometimes a wealthy parent can be joined to divorce proceedings, for example if they have a history of making large payments to their child, or if they are likely to be the one who meets the order.If this happens to you, you will want to protect your wealth and minimise the amount you might have to pay to your child’s spouse. The involvement of third parties is very fact specific, but as experienced family lawyers, Vardags will help you minimise the cost of your involvement.

When an entrepreneur gets divorced, their spouse can sometimes try to get their company joined to proceedings. In doing so, they might be trying to extract cash from the business or dispute how it is owned and held. If you find yourself in this situation, you may well want to make representations to the court.Vardags, with our corporate understanding and family law expertise, are well placed to advise you. Our in-house forensic accountancy team can help you produce realistic arguments about the value, ownership, and liquidity of the business, whilst understanding the aims and procedure of the family courts.

Specialisms

Divorce lawyers for clients of specific gender or sexuality

OUR Divorce TEAM

Ayesha Vardag

Founder & President Ayesha Vardag
“Ayesha Vardag - Britain's top divorce lawyer.” 
The Telegraph

Stephen Bence

Chief Executive Officer Stephen Bence
“Dr Stephen Bence is a financial genius.” 
Lewis Marks QC

Georgina Hamblin

Senior Director - Head of London Family Georgina Hamblin
“One of the best divorce lawyers in the country.” 
Marie Claire

Is Vardags Right For You?

We offer a free consultation to qualifying individuals. Please call our confidential enquiry line on 020 7404 9390. Lines are staffed 24 hours.

When you contact us a member of our client relations team will take the full details of your situation, assess whether we can assist you, and if so, determine the best team for your case. 

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