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Parental Responsibility

Local Authority Parental Responsibility


What is parental responsibility?  Parental responsibility (PR) is defined in the Children Act 1989 as the "rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and authority" which a parent of a child obtains, by law, in relation to the child. In practical terms, this...

Special Guardianship Orders


A special guardian is an adult who has been appointed under a special guardianship order (SGO) to care for a child on a long-term basis. An SGO falls somewhere between a child arrangements order (which determines where a child lives) and an adoption order. It is intended...

Changing a child's surname


Names are central to our identity and how we construct a sense of self, both on an individual level and in terms of how we relate to our families and the wider world. They affect how we are seen and how we see ourselves.   The definition of a surname...

Failure to pay child maintenance


Who pays child maintenance?  Although no two families are the same, and every domestic situation is different, when parents separate, there is often one parent who takes over day-to-to day care of the children. This will also be the parent...

Resolving disputes over a child's medical treatment


Discussions surrounding a child’s medical treatment are contained within the ambit of parental responsibility.   Parental responsibility is defined in section 2 of the Children Act 1989 as “all the rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and...

Parental Order


What is a parental order? Parental orders are used where a child is born via a surrogacy arrangement in order to transfer parental rights from the birth mother to the people that are going to raise the child as the intended parents. This is a very important order since...

Guide to stepparent rights


When trying to understand your rights to a child, it is important to make the distinction between being a parent and having parental responsibility. The two are not the same thing. For example, biologically you can be a child’s parent, however at the same time, for...

The information on this website is intended as a guide and does not constitute legal advice. Vardags do not accept liability for any errors in the information on this website, nor any losses stemming from reliance upon the statements made herein. All articles and pages aim to reflect the legal position at time they were published, and may have been rendered obsolete by subsequent developments in the law. Should you require specialist advice, tailored to your situation, please see how Vardags can help you.

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